Ray Rice is a creep, but I bet he was unlucky enough to have been exposed to a lot of violence against women since he was a child. He should know better and should face consequences.

I think he brought the worst consequence on himself. His woman will never look at him with the same depth of respect or admiration [whatever that was before] again.

He will never have any woman who can look to him for absolute safety and protection. She will always wonder when the next blow will fall.

His children will never see in him a good example of how a man should treat a woman. His daughters will never look to him and see the kind of man they should look to for a mate.

He will never have a woman stay with him only because she wants to, not because she can’t financially or emotionally live on her own.

People sometimes think of karma as a kind of cosmic justice system that slaps evildoers for their bad actions. That is not the Eastern concept of karma at all. Karma is made by the individual on their own. You become the sum total of your deeds and character. The Buddhist notion is that everything you do, good or bad, is what builds your destiny.

It takes a special person to break the cycle. To transcend the rottenness they have been exposed to. I like what Jesus said in Matthew 15, it is not what goes into a man that defiles him, but rather what comes out of him.

I have friends who have lived though some especially terrible things and yet have gone on to become wonderful people. I hope Ray Rice can someday get his integrity back. I am one of the people who believe it can happen.

domestic abuse abuse wife beater violent family violence relationship men and women trust respect karma forgiveness redemption integrity

Leonardo da Vinci’s original “Mona Lisa” (L) which hangs in the Louvre in Paris, and a recently discovered and restored copy of the “Mona Lisa” painting as it was displayed at Madrid’s El Prado Museum is seen in this combination photo. The recently restored copy was completed by one of Da Vinci’s apprentices most likely at the same time as the master himself painted the original.

leonardo leonardo da vinci louvre prado La Giocona Mona Lisa smile masterpiece painting art renaissance italian renaissance spain

Beaghmore - was first uncovered in 1945-9 when 1269 stones were uncovered, they had been buried in the thick layer of peat that is a dominating feature of this area. Further work in 1965 revealed more of the complex, although it is almost certain that further structures still lie buried in the surrounding peat. A total of seven circles, six of which are paired, were discovered, along with many cairns, some of which have associated stone rows. A typical feature of the Beaghmore stone rows is a “high and low” arrangement where short rows of tall stones run beside much longer rows of small stones. The rows may show rough alignments to the midwinter sunset at the SW, although an horizon raised 3 degrees or so by a nearby tree line would be necessary for these alignments to be valid.

The circles and rows we see at the site today are thought to date from about 1600 BC, the early Bronze Age, but they are not the earliest evidence of usage of the site. Hearths and deposits of flint tools were discovered and have been carbon dated to 2900-2600BC, in addition, several of the stone rows run over the tumbled walls of field structures which also date from the Neolithic period.

Beaghmore - was first uncovered in 1945-9 when 1269 stones were uncovered, they had been buried in the thick layer of peat that is a dominating feature of this area. Further work in 1965 revealed more of the complex, although it is almost certain that further structures still lie buried in the surrounding peat. A total of seven circles, six of which are paired, were discovered, along with many cairns, some of which have associated stone rows. A typical feature of the Beaghmore stone rows is a “high and low” arrangement where short rows of tall stones run beside much longer rows of small stones. The rows may show rough alignments to the midwinter sunset at the SW, although an horizon raised 3 degrees or so by a nearby tree line would be necessary for these alignments to be valid.

The circles and rows we see at the site today are thought to date from about 1600 BC, the early Bronze Age, but they are not the earliest evidence of usage of the site. Hearths and deposits of flint tools were discovered and have been carbon dated to 2900-2600BC, in addition, several of the stone rows run over the tumbled walls of field structures which also date from the Neolithic period.

Beaghmore ireland stone circle megalithic astronomy Bronze age neolithic stonehenge cairns archaeology palentology